Security Technologies Minor | Technological Leadership Institute

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Get the Expertise to Keep Our World a Safer Place

Develop Strategies for Business, Industry & Government

Get the leadership training needed to make the world a safer place with a graduate minor in Security Technologies. This minor is for graduate students who want additional expertise in security systems technologies or security risk management. The Security Technologies minor helps students develop the expertise to create policies and strategies for business, industry and government at any level. 

  • 9 Credits for Master's Minor
  • 12 Credits for Doctoral Minor
  • 11 Courses to Customize Minor

Security Specialization

Students customize their minor from the Master of Science in Security Technologies core courses that best suit their specialization. A detailed description of those core courses is listed in the menu below:

MSST Core Courses

ST 8110 Security Science & Technology Foundations (3 credits)
Overview of emerging science and pivotal technology disciplines for homeland security (including nanotechnology, sensor networks including bio sensing, critical infrastructure protection, food and bio safety, cyber and control systems security, and secure energy technologies). Current state-of the-art status for each technology, together with barriers and opportunities for commercialization will be addressed.

ST 8330 Critical Infrastructure Protection (3 credits)
Discover an overview of risk, its definition and application to critical infrastructures as it relates to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan, as well as best practices to reduce the vulnerability of critical infrastructure systems due to accidents, material failure, natural disasters, or terrorist attacks.

ST 8510 Partnership in Conflict Management I: Psychology/Behavior Intelligence for Homeland Security (2 credits)
Receive a broad overview of intelligence based on political psychology and behavior, as well as psychological effects on terrorism; status of and fallacies related to the interventions applied to victims of terrorism; current government strategies used to disseminate information to terrorist groups; psychological phenomena related to media coverage of terrorism; and misconceptions and inaccuracies relating to socio-political and religious motivations of terrorist groups.

ST 8109 Cyber Security Foundations: Technology, Risk & Communication (2 credits)
Explore cyber security risks through evaluation of consumer driven technology concepts and their applicability to enterprise. Learn how technology works, how to understand and communicate risks to business management, and deliver actionable risk mitigation approaches. Discover core technology concepts that face both consumers and businesses as well as security standards and benchmarks that guide industry.

ST 8111 Methods, Theory, and Applications (2.5 credits)
Focus on methods, theory, techniques, and models including qualitative and quantitative risk modeling, decision analysis (fault-tree analysis and event-tree analysis), and probabilistic risk assessment techniques.

ST 8113 Information and Cyber Security (2 credits)
Develop an understanding of vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure systems to failure—focusing on cyberterrorism—and recommended security solutions for operational levels of trust.

ST 8221 Communication of Risk and Security (1 credit)
Explore the various aspects of risk communication, public speaking, formal briefings, and writing skills.

ST 8511 Partnership in Conflict Management II: Public Policy (1 credit)
Examine key questions and issues facing the U.S. intelligence community and its role in homeland security and homeland defense, as well as address policy, organizational, and substantive issues regarding homeland intelligence support.

ST 8220 Vulnerability, Risk, and Threat Assessment and Management (3 credits)
Focus on principles, methods, and practices of threat and vulnerability assessment and risk reduction, as well as integration of risk assessment and management principles into strategic planning and decision making.

ST 8331 Dynamic Systems Modeling and Simulation Tools (2 credits)
Unearth techniques for modeling complex systems and predicting and evaluating risks associated with a variety of sources, pathways, and consequences, as well as a survey of key dynamical equations and non-sensitive databases that are used in computer simulations of linked infrastructure systems.

ST 8512 Partnership in Conflict Management III: Security/Privacy Law, Social Responsibility, and Ethics (2 credits)
Explore the challenges to American civil liberties and national security in times of terrorism, ethical and moral concepts underlying American civil rights and acts of terrorism against the U.S., and the application of the U.S. Constitution to Homeland Security laws.

Prerequisites

In order to pursue the MSST graduate minor, you must meet the following prerequisites:
-Bachelor’s degree from an accredited program
-Currently enrolled in a master’s degree program at the University of Minnesota
-3.0 GPA from all prior coursework

Now Accepting Non-degree Seeking Students

Select courses in the Security Technologies minor are also open to non-degree seeking students. These courses provide great professional development for industry professionals. The drop-down below includes all open-enrollment courses.

Open Enrollment Courses

ST 8109 Cyber Security Foundations: Technology, Risk and Communication
Explore cyber security risks through evaluation of consumer driven technology concepts and their applicability to enterprise. Learn how technology works, how to understand and communicate risks to business management, and deliver actionable risk mitigation approaches. Discover core technology concepts that face both consumers and businesses as well as security standards and benchmarks that guide industry. 

ST 8113 Information and Cyber Security
Develop an understanding of vulnerabilities of critical infrastructure systems to failure—focusing on cyberterrorism—and recommended security solutions for operational levels of trust.

ST 8111 Methods, Theory and Applications
Focus on methods, theory, techniques, and models including qualitative and quantitative risk modeling, decision analysis (fault-tree analysis and event-tree analysis), and probabilistic risk assessment techniques.

ST 8512 Partnership in Conflict Management III: Security/Privacy Law, Social Responsibility and Ethics
Explore the challenges to American civil liberties and national security in times of terrorism, ethical and moral concepts underlying American civil rights and acts of terrorism against the U.S., and the application of the U.S. Constitution to Homeland Security laws.

Questions?

Please contact our admissions staff at 
tli-info@umn.edu
 with any questions you have regarding degree or non-degree seeking course enrollment.

Mike Johnson, MSST director of graduate studies